Cantaloupe Vine

Hit the bricks! I am relieved and pleased that the cantaloupe seeds that I planted this year are now showing some success. I have several vines and, if they all fruit, well, cantaloupe will be my new food garden best friend! I place the fruit on bricks to keep them away from potential problems from sitting in excess moisture. The vines are taking over this particular raised row bed garden (I have 4 separate raised row bed gardens) and I will keep repositioning the vines to make sure there aren’t “traffic jams” among the competing and ever-lengthening vines. As more fruits develop, I will dutifully find more bricks. My busy workweek has me watering my food garden nearly each day, but I’m not inspecting each plant for every change they may be undergoing. When I eyed these beauties, I said out loud, “Melons!” I’m really excited for how this section of my garden shapes up!

 

Brussels Sprouts Stalk, Close Up

This Brussels sprouts stalk was ready for its close-up! I planted seeds in my raised row bed garden last year and months later, am seeing healthy results. I’ll soon remove the tops of the more mature stalks so that my currently small sprouts will become much bigger. Frankly, I’m just happy seeing that the seeds I planted successfully germinated! I’m amused with how excited I still get with any kind of gardening success. I’ll be planting more Brussels sprouts seeds in another part of the garden in September. It’s a good thing I love to eat Brussels sprouts! Even so, this sturdy, vigorous vegetable is aesthetically pleasing as well.

Informative video on this topic, by Gary Pilarchik (2014) is posted here:

 

Partly Red Lettuce, Unknown But Cherished

It’s bound to happen (and probably not the last). Around 2 weeks after I plant seeds in my raised row bed gardens, I see if they have germinated. If they have not, I make a decision on planting more of those seeds or perhaps plant seeds from an entirely different vegetable or fruit. Well, I no longer have the empty seed packet (likely from seed I’d kept from previous years), but I now have a few of these rather strikingly lovely partly red lettuces. A variety of butterhead perhaps?

This year, I’ve had to replant several seeds (birds regularly feed in my garden), so my raised rows may end up with a rather fun and eclectic mix of “Hey, you made it!” and “I was expecting you!” Sounds like a rather interesting party!

Brussels Sprouts, Season 1

I’m pleased to see that the seeds took to my raised row bed garden! It’s my first attempt at growing Brussels sprouts, and assuming that they like where they are, these lovely plants will eventually produce the sprouts that I dearly love to eat. I am tempted to harvest a few of the leaves, though. They look so enticing in the sunlight, don’t they?

A Row of Curly Endive or Frisée

In a fairly straight raised garden row, as nature intended, right? Over several vigorous afternoons, I cleared away back yard weeds (nearly done) and was overjoyed to see that they were not able to overtake the redoubtable but delicious and elegant frisée. They’re almost too lovely to eat, but I do and I am tempted to leave a few to stay on simply because they class up the place. I’ve more frisée seeds to indulge this idea.

As in past seasons, I am keeping track of what will really grow well in my microclimate. It’s often quite frustrating to read the back of seed packets and seeing that “crop X” grows in my area, but then it doesn’t, or not very well, despite efforts. Other times, I take a chance and grow something I don’t guess would do well but it does.

In the meantime, I’ve got bottles of fancy Italian olive oil and balsamic vinegar ready for one these frilly beauties this evening!

Curly Endive or Frisée

Frisée sounds so elegant, oui? Curly endive is a wonderful addition to a food garden and several of these lovely plants are growing in my raised row bed garden. Started from seed a few months ago, these true beauties are gracing my garden with their very elegant frilly leaves. They are destined for my salad plate but in the meantime, I am enjoying the very lovely difference they provide for my entire backyard garden!img_1716

Mesclun

After a failed attempt earlier this year, I am pleased that the mesclun seeds that I planted several weeks ago have germinated. This is the first time I’ve attempted to grow mesclun (among other new seeds). I’m taking note of which seeds are likely to successfully germinate into mature crops, the time of year that success happens, etc. Speaking with friends, they’re surprised that the food plants that have succeeded in my area, as well as those that have failed, and vice-versa.  The microclimate of my food garden is always a great classroom for hands-on learning and experience! These young salad greens will (hopefully) make it to my salad bowl before too long.img_1659

Aunt Ruby’s German Green Tomatoes

You’d think I’d never grown tomatoes before, but I’m so excited when a tomato plant is fruiting! I ran out of raised row and container space (first world problem) so I planted one Aunt Ruby’s German tomato seed in the ground. It must love this location because the plant has grown tall and wide and is covered in tomatoes. Wow! This makes me want to plant a third of these and other tomato seeds in raised rows, a third in containers, and a third in the ground next year. Best laid plants!

The tomatoes are in various stages of maturity, but the one pictured may be ready to pick in no more than two weeks. This beautiful heirloom tomato looks mighty fine and, I’m sure, will be very, very delicious!img_3374

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE: The non-fruit parts of tomato plants are poisonous if ingested. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Lemon Cucumber

Mildly sweet, this cucumber is wonderful straight from the vine. I pulled one off the vine minutes ago, scraped off the bristles, rinsed it off with the garden hose, and ate it in the garden. IMG_3372Very luxurious, and delicious! The vines are still in various stages of maturity, so I will continue to enjoy them over the next several weeks. Started from seed and grown in containers, I will be growing this heirloom cucumber in years to come!

Armenian Cucumbers, Garden Debut

This is my first attempt growing Armenian cucumbers. Some I’ve grown in containers (as shown here), with tomato cages, and others I’m attempting to grow in raised row gardens. I only planted the seeds in the raised row gardens over the weekend. I started all of these plants from seed … which I’ve kept in an unopened packet for over a year! Be sure to keep those older unopened (and even opened) packets of seeds, because they may still be good. A type of muskmelon (as are cantaloupes, which I’m also growing in a raised row bed garden, from seed), I am very eager to make some wonderful salads where these cucumbers will be the star attraction!IMG_1536IMG_1537

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