Pear Trees Removed Because of Beetle Damage

Sadly, I had my pear trees removed this morning. I made the decision to remove the pear trees because the snout beetle, also known as plum curculio, had been drilling holes into and destroying all of my fruit. The damage worsened over the past few weeks, making it untenable to keep these 4-1/2 year-old trees. The greater presence of the beetles increased the risk that they would damage my apple trees also, of which only one is currently in fruit.IMG_3080

It had been very instructive to have these 3-in-1 pear trees, if only for a few years. During that time, I learned about how dwarf varieties of pear trees are kept small in size because they are grafted onto quince rootstock. I also learned that sometimes, quince can overtake the tree and transform a pear tree into a quince tree. I learned more about brown rot and snout beetles than I ever thought I needed to know. I was able to enjoy a few pears and even one Asian pear that grew from these trees, so the loss has been bittersweet.

I have not yet decided what to do with these now-empty spaces. I have a gardening project that I am finishing up and will post with more information very shortly, so maybe this empty space can be added on to that project. Or I may end up planting two new fruit trees. That small space is a blank canvas so I will have to think what might best go here, in the context of the other types of elements in the yard and my budget. I hope to come up with a happy solution soon.

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of these fruits.

More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

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Quince Fruit: Culprit Drilling Tiny Holes Identified

Last year, I was quite saddened and frustrated at having lost almost every fruit of my quince trees to brown rot, a common fungus that attacks stone fruits. However, it did not occur to me that more than a fungus was at play here. Today, after pruning unwanted growth from my 3-in-1 pear trees (which now almost exclusively produces quince), I discovered the telltale signs of insect involvement. I found a brown, crescent-shaped scar on the outside of one of the immature fruit and several others with tiny pinholes drilled into them.IMG_3063

After doing an Internet search, I found that the culprit is the plum curculio (AKA Conotrachelus nenuphar). This tiny weevil or snout beetle drills holes into the fruit (also apples, nectarines, pears, peaches, and plums), lays eggs, which turn to larvae. The larvae burrow toward the center of the fruit and leave nasty dark brown trails as evidence of their feeding. When the larvae are ready to enter the world, they exit the rotten fruit through the same hole that their mother made. The tiny holes drilled into the fruit make the fruit more susceptible to diseases like brown rot.

At least in my garden, I now know that these two culprits are working as partners in destroying my fruit. Several of the immature fruits look intact but I will be checking on them weekly, if not more often. Knowing the vulnerabilities in my garden will help me to be a better gardener and maybe enjoy some quince this year. I loathe the thought of cutting down my two trees, especially since they are still quite young, but I may if their problems spread to my apple trees.

An excellent series of photos of these brown trails and drill holes can be found here: http://www.thekitchn.com/quince-report-good-news-and-ba-65559

More information on the plum curculio beetle can be found here:http://entoweb.okstate.edu/ddd/insects/plumcurculio.htm

How To: Treatment of plum curculio for the home gardener is to just remove fallen fruit but I just would rather not give the larvae a chance to hit ground and have a chance to reproduce so I cut the fruit off the tree when I spot beetle damage and throw it away in the covered green-waste bin several yards away from the trees. More information on treatment can be found here: http://www2.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef202.asp

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of these fruits.

More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Birds: Bushtits in My 3-in-1 Pear Tree

My 3-in-1 pear trees (which produced quince but no traditional pears this season)  are very popular with birds. For a long time, I’ve known that bushtits enjoy flitting to and from these particular trees but it’s been very difficult to capture them in photos, until today!IMG_2927

It’s somewhat hard to see but one of the acrobatic birds is the dark gray, small but plump blob in the center of this photo, underneath the long, thin horizontal branch. The head is a little darker than the rest of the body. Click on the image to get a better look.

They’re very gregarious and tweet a lot while they’re hanging out – I wonder what they are saying to each other?

Many birders strive to get the “perfect,” crisp, close-up shot of a highly colorful male bird, with its face pointed directly at the camera lens without any physical obstructions to block that perfect shot. That’s not often possible, nor realistic! Oftentimes, I will check my backyard and spot a bird and identify it by its song or view of its tail, etc. In other words, I like to see birds in situ. This photo brings me great joy, and to me, the capture of a lovely moment in time.

More information about this delightful and lively birds can be found here: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bushtit/id

In the background, with its mighty sword-like leaves,  is one of my dragon trees, grown from a branch cutting, in a container.

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of these fruits.

More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Asian Pear Growing on My Pear-Quince Tree!

Well, okay, then! My two 3-in-1 pear trees have undergone a dramatic transformation: initially, they produced traditional pears, then the pears were overtaken by quince (my dwarf pear trees are grafted onto quince rootstock to keep them dwarf-sized). I do not know yet the mechanism that caused the quince to overtake the pear.

Now, one of these trees has produced a single Asian pear! As mentioned in previous posts, I purchased my two pear trees as saplings, from the clearance bin of a local gardening center. The labels said “3-in-1,” which I took to mean three varieties of pears, but in addition to the labels, there were five additional plastic tags wrapped around each sapling. Asian pear was not mentioned. Quite the mystery! I really do not know how many types of fruits are possible on either of these trees. A grafting experiment gone awry?

But I am happy to report the presence of an Asian pear (unknown variety). I savored it and appreciated the delicious subtle flavor. It was still warm from the summer sun, crisp and very juicy. I do not know if this will be the only Asian pear that my trees will ever produce but I am grateful for any such delicious surprises in the future!

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of these fruits.

More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Mourning Dove in the Shade!

Summer time, and the living is easy! Or so it seems for this mourning dove, sitting quietly and enjoying the shade (and safety) underneath one of my 3-in-1 pear trees! This lucky bird has been in this spot for at least 20 minutes! The bird is in the middle of the photo, amidst the shadows.

Several mourning doves have similarly rested underneath these particular trees. I am happy that my trees provide fruit for me and respite for the birds!

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The seeds of pears are highly toxic if ingested.  More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Quince Aplenty!

Wow! It’s been only a few short years since I have had these two lovely fruit trees. They are dwarf 3-in-1 pear trees, which means that they were grafted onto quince rootstock to keep the trees small.

In the beginning, both of these trees were producing pears. Now, they are awash with quince! I am not sure if or when pears will return. The quinces seem to have suppressed the production of pears. A similar circumstance is playing out right now with my hybrid tea rose, Sunblest. It is a yellow rose that was grafted onto the red Dr. Huey rose rootstock. Dr. Huey has  appeared this year on my Sunblest rose, but not overtaken it. Very interesting.

This year has been the most abundant ever, in terms of fruit production for these pear trees. Last year, the trees produced just a handful of quince fruits. From modest to bounty, indeed!

In the second photo, on the right-hand side, you will see bright green plastic gardening ties. I am using them to hold up some branches that are weighed down with fruit. Some branches are hanging low, near the soil, so I will have to keep adding supports to alleviate the stress on the branches and to keep hungry ground-dwelling critters at bay.

The second photo is what I see from my home office. Lovely! This particular tree is very popular with sparrows, bushtits, and hummingbirds, who enjoy hanging out on the branches. Mourning doves particularly enjoy sitting in the shade that the tree provides.

These wonderful trees have brought great happiness to my garden and home!

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of the quince. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Mourning Doves Under a Pear Tree

My 3-in-1 pear tree is covered with small quinces right now,  as well as many leaves. These mourning doves have taken the opportunity to rest underneath it.

Oftentimes, one would expect to find birds foraging, building a nest, looking for mates, and so on. But this is like a little slice of life. And this is not the first time that mourning doves have visited this tree. Spa day!

One of the great pleasures of gardening, for me, is that it allows me to indulge in birdwatching on a daily basis. I enjoy the opportunity to better understand their behavior and to look more closely at their features for identifying marks.

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of the quince. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Buzzing About Pears!

I am very pleased to report that my 3-in-1 pear trees are not only in flower, but are being visited by bees! There has been somewhat lower bee activity in my back yard over the past few years. I am not certain what has accounted for this, but there have been concerns about lower bee activity overall in the United States. Notably, colony collapse disorder has been offered as one of the reasons (http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572).

This weekend is the start of my pre-spring clean-up of my back yard, primarily removal of weeds. Some of the weeds had flowered, attracting bees not only to the weeds but to my fruit trees nearby.

For that reason, I was reluctant to start my weed removal project until now. Hopefully, the bees will find my fruit tree blossoms to be more tasty!

My pear (and apple) trees are dotted with blossoms. My apple tree also has small fruits. I anticipate a harvest this season of apples, pears, and quince (as mentioned in my previous post, my 3-in-1 pear tree was grafted onto the rootstock of a quince, so it is a pear and quince tree!).

I am very hopeful that the bees will coming with great regularity to my garden from now on. I (and my plants) have missed them greatly!

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  Pear and apple seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

It’s A Quince!

What a shocking but happy reveal! My 3-in-1 pear trees have produced juicy pears commonly found in supermarkets, but what I thought were fuzzy pears, with their unusual apple-like shape got me to investigating a bit more. Why would a pear be fuzzy, I thought.

I found out more information about my two 3-in-1 pear trees. Yes, they produce pears; I’ve eaten them. But my trees are also dwarf varieties, and that was the key to unlocking this mysterious fruit.

As it turns out, dwarf pear trees are often grafted onto a smaller quince rootstock, to keep the trees small. How very interesting! If you have a dwarf pear tree that is producing what looks to be a fuzzy pear, you might have a quince on your hands! Let me know if this has happened to you also.

As shown in my photo above, taken within the hour, the fuzz will rub off easily, but I’m letting nature take care of that as it matures. The fruit used to be bright green, but will be ripe and ready for picking when it becomes yellow. One of my quinces fell to the ground and, at the time, I still thought it was a pear. I cleaned it off and cut off a small piece and discovered very quickly how very sour a raw, immature quince really is!

My more productive tree has five quinces growing right now, about the same size, the size of an average apple. I will likely cook a very cherished, boutique quantity of jelly from it. I absolutely love, love, love having surprises like this. Pears and quinces grown on both of these trees.

I am curious which of the variety of pears was pushed out, if any, to accommodate the quince on my trees.  I bought these two 3-in-1 pear trees, bareroot, on clearance, and they each had five labels attached to them! It would be fabulous if I had on each tree quince plus three varieties of pear. Dare to dream!

By the way, the quince is not widely grown in the USA, fewer than 200 acres. For more information about the quince, including its history, see http://afrsweb.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/jan07/quince0107.htm?pf=1.

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  The quince is related to apples and pears, whose seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  For this reason, do not ingest the seeds of the quince. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Fuzzy Pear Update

10/1/2011 Update: This is a quince! Read more about this here:  https://janedata.wordpress.com/2011/10/01/its-a-quince/

One of the fuzzy pears on my 3-in-1 pear trees has revealed what is under all of that fuzz: a beautiful, bright green skin! With the help of breezes and corresponding friction of adjacent leaves, some of the fuzz of this immature pear was scraped off.

So far, the pear looks to have a short neck. As mentioned in previous posts, this 3-in-1 pear tree, although identified as such, had more than 3 tags on it, so I am not yet sure what this particular pear variety is. Mystery!  I have 2 such trees, and this season, only this variety has emerged on both trees. It’s been quite a fuzzy season!

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE:  Pear seeds are highly toxic if ingested.  More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

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