Angel Face Roses in Flower and in Bud!

It’s been about a month since I rescued four Angel Face rose plants from the clearance bin, and I am so pleased that each of these plants is covered in flowers and/or buds. What a short wait to be graced with these blissfully lovely flowers in my yard! The scent is very sweet and the color is wonderful. Sometimes when I take a chance on clearance bin plants, it may take a year or more to see the potential of the plants realized, mostly because of some rehabilitation that’s needed to restore them to good health. But these roses were clearly in tip-top health, only needing a permanent place to call home. A dream come true!IMG_3364

Rescued: Angel Face Roses and Thornless Raspberry Bushes

My local home improvement store has a gardening center with an outstanding clearance section, with plants of all sorts at amazing discounted prices. Their inventory of clearance plants has recently increased so, in the foreseeable future, I will be visiting at least once a week. Yesterday, I was very fortunate to have made my weekly visit and came away with 4 Angel Face rose plants, a floribunda that I’ve wanted for my home for the past several years, but finally got around to doing something about.IMG_3354IMG_3355
I also am the caregiver of 3 thornless raspberry bushes. I love to make homemade raspberry jam and now I have a wonderful resource to do it! The plants were all in reasonably good condition, although I will have to do some light pruning of a small bit of dead vegetation. Easy. One of the raspberry bushes has some young fruits on it – very encouraging!

I replanted them in larger containers (saved from years of gardening projects) and will be looking forward to many happy years with these wonderful new plants. What is seen as refuse by the store (and most people) represents a great opportunity to bring new (sometimes unexpected) plants into the garden, for a modest price. These plants have already uplifted the energy of my entire garden!

More information on Angel Face roses: http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.238

More information on thornless raspberry bushes: http://www.monrovia.com/plant-catalog/plants/3466/brazelberries-raspberry-shortcake-dwarf-thornless-raspberry/

Dr. Huey Rose Pushing Out Grace English Rose?

Dr. Huey has struck again, this time for one of my Grace English roses. That particular plant had not produced Grace roses in the past season, and it may be because it was quietly being overtaken by the dreaded Dr. Huey rose. Dr. Huey was, apparently, the rootstock onto which this particular rose plant was grafted. My hope is that, if anything, Grace will return and co-exist with Dr. Huey (if I don’t start attempting to remove Dr. Huey first!). If Dr. Huey has pushed out Grace, I will accept it, but time will tell if that is the case. I will also keep an eye on my other English roses, all of which I’ve kept in their original containers, including this Grace. Sigh.IMG_1481

Simple Arrangement of Short-Stemmed Roses

Some of my roses are blooming, but none of them are long-stemmed. But that does not preclude the creation of simple flower arrangements! These short-stemmed beauties required that I use a long and shallow container, which I happened to have: the almighty cover of a butter dish that I turned upside down, filled with a little granulated sugar, white vinegar, and water. The yellow ones are the Sunblest rose; the pink ones on the ends are Mary Rose; the peachy one in the center is the Grace rose; and the dIMG_3346ark red-pink one toward the right is the (hard-to-keep-down) Dr. Huey rose. This very simple flower arrangement has already made quite a difference in my bathroom (house!) and I am looking forward to days and nights of admiring their loveliness!

Indoor Orchids: New Flower Spikes

Three of my indoor orchids – miltonia and phalaenopsis – are showing new growth of flower spikes. The one with the two shoots at the base of the plant is the miltonia. All of these are plants I found in the clearance bin at various supermarkets over the years. Very glad they are happy in their new home. With spring a week away, it’s a nice preview of things to come and a gentle good-bye to winter!IMG_3341IMG_3340IMG_3339

Miltonia Orchid

This is my first miltonia orchid. I stumbled across it in the clearance section of my grocery store this morning. Some of the flowers are in a state of elegant decay but several remain fresh. I was struck by the deep brownish red petals, so unusually glamorous. I am quite pleased that this Brazilian native will now live comfortably ensconced in my home – looking forward to showering this beauty with looks of awe and gratitude each day!IMG_3338

English Rose: Mary Rose as a Cut Flower

Not all cut flowers require a long stem for them to be appreciated in a jar or vase! I grow several English rose plants outdoors, in their containers. One of my pink Mary Rose plants has been flowering a bit and I noticed that one flower is now near the point when the flower petals are close to falling. It’s at that point that I cut such flowers and preserve as much of their short stem that I can and set them in very small jars, filled with a 1/2 teaspoon of granulated sugar, 1/2 teaspoon of distilled white vinegar, and warm water, to be enjoyed indoors for as long as they can still last. Usually, I enjoy my roses growing and staying on the plant through their life cycle, but this fragrant rose – in my  mind, it’s a shame to have it literally fall apart without as much as a word of a proper good-bye. I have several such rose plants whose flowers grow on short stems and I often give them this elegant treatment.

So, in tribute to all of the beautiful energy that this flower brings to my garden, I bring it indoors, so that it may still receive great appreciation until the end. This will grace my bathroom for at least a week and will class up the overall feeling of my home for at least that long. Having just one cut flower can make such a tremendous difference!IMG_3333IMG_3336

Uninhibited English Rose!

Last year, I was very fortunate to have bought a few dozen David Austin English roses. I grow them in the containers that they came in. One of the climbers, Crown Princess Margareta, has let it be known that it will not be following the conventions of gardening, container or no! Right next to a very warm wall, this rose plant is loving its location and is letting its canes go wild. For safety reasons (walking into a cane of spikes is no fun), I will have to find at least a minimal staking scheme using one or more tallIMG_3325 metal rods since it soundly defeated an attempt with wood stakes. It will not win prizes for form, but certainly receives acknowledgment for its vigor and desire to express itself!

I am wondering what it will look like when it flowers. The unexpected growth pattern of this plant certainly is adding a very lively and happy energy to my garden. Out with the same old, same old and in with wild and free  artistic form!

Amaryllis Moved Outdoors, Now in Flower

Roaring like a lion, a Red Lion amaryllis, that is! I moved all three of my amaryllis plants outdoors about a 18 months ago. They’ve been quiet for a while, producing healthy green leaves but no flowers, until now! A Red Lion amaryllis is producing one flower, which I am glad to see. Although I’m used to seeing 4 flowers per plant, it is heartening to see that the move outdoors did not wipe out the flower-producing power of at least this one might amaryllis. As time goes by, there may be more flowers from this one plant, or perhaps flowers from the other amaryllis bulbs.IMG_3309

Modest victories like these are so lovely, especially when they happen in an unexpected season. Welcome (outdoors) Red Lion amaryllis!

Mystery Orchids: Mystery Two Is Solved

As expected, Mystery Two (of Five) is now solved. Like my first Mystery Orchid, the second of my five mystery orchids has revealed itself to be a deeply colored fuchsia Phalaenopsis. It’s not full opened, but I couldn’t contain my great excitement at seeing this mystery solved at last. I am quite pleased that a few more flower buds are so close to blooming as well.IMG_3304

The other three orchid plants remain a mystery since they are not spiking at the moment, just lovely green leaves. That leaves room for more happy reveals as the year goes on!

 

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