Accidental Rose Propagation

Not the first time I’ve stumbled upon something (very probably) great because of inaction! Because of my unresolved gopher problem, I grow my roses in containers above ground. Most of my rose plants are in their original 5-gallon plastic containers from when I bought them. I see that some of them need to be re-potted because they are thriving. How will I do it? Very carefully! That is a project I will tackle soon. I recently had to move one of the containers because I had a project in the back yard and needed to move it to create easier back yard access. That container has a Mary Rose (David Austin rose). One of its roots had grown through one of the drainage holes, through the landscape fabric, and into the bare soil underneath it, and bound the plant/container tight to the ground. No movement. With great trepidation, I freed the container from the root (by rotating the container a few times), hoping that the plant in the container would live. It does!

I didn’t think too much of this situation after I finished my project. A few weeks later, however, I discovered that there appeared to be a rogue Mary Rose plant that has developed from the root that continued to live. Wow! Check it out in the photo. On the left is the parent Mary Rose plant and notice that it already has a cane shooting out from one of the container’s drainage holes. The new plant on the right came from this rather robust parent plant. I water this new plant along with my other plants every week. It’s too early to tell if this accidentally propagated rose will survive and flower, but it’s sure nice to think about!

How To: I had tried unsuccessfully to propagate other types of roses in the past with rooting hormone, but this is quite an unexpected, inadvertent way: grow it in a container until roots grow through the container’s drainage holes. Let the plant stay this way for apparently a least a few months. Then, free the container (with plant still in it) and water the area where the rogue root bore through also. Now, I didn’t know that the root was still alive and following its destiny to grow into a new plant, so I did not water that area immediately after freeing the parent plant from its bound condition.  Once the new rose plant showed up (and clearly was not a weed), I watered it and here it is. I’m hoping for really good things from this new plant. Though its future is unknown, this new plant was successfully borne from the parent. Excitement!

 

 

 

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Mister Lincoln Rose

I’m very pleased that one of my Mister Lincoln roses is in flower, especially on this Memorial Day. The other is in bud, so more of these beautiful hybrid tea roses will be coming in this end of spring and hopefully into the summer. The fragrance is strong and luscious. Because of the permanent gopher population in my city (roots of roses are favored by gophers), this and most of my other roses thrive in containers. It’s heartening that this glorious beauty endures in the face of an environment that is not ideal, a true testament to the strength of this wonderful rose!

More information about this rose: http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.2104

Great Blue Lobelia, Unexpected Garden Visitor

To my delight, as I was watering one of my container raspberry plants today, I discovered that a great blue lobelia plant (Lobelia siphilitica) has taken up residence in this same container. I’ve not grown this in my garden before, so I’m assuming that the fates saw to it that at least one seed from another garden has found its way here, and for that I’m grateful. How beautiful is this lovely flower? Most times, when an errant plant takes hold in my garden, it’s a common weed, but not today! If these are the types of  “accidentals” that land in my garden, I welcome them heartedly with open arms. I will do all I can to take care of it and will carefully transplant it into its own container after it has finished flowering. There are many books and writings about gardens that are well planned and firmly controlled. In keeping with my temperament and interests, I like a bit of the unexpected and adapting and learning to new challenges as I go along, one of the many great joys I derive from tending my humble garden!

Thornless Blackberry Plants, Fruiting

A few of my thornless blackberry plants have some immature fruits, with some just starting to show some color. I started out with 5 of these plants in containers, but a few canes sprang up in the surrounding soil (at least 4 as of today), so I’m guessing I’ll  have at least some blackberry bragging rights before the season is through!  Between that and my raspberry plants, my berry needs have been more than met!

Caged: Thornless Blackberry Plants

I was fortunate to have a few hours tonight after work to tidy up my large containers of thornless blackberry plants. Using some of the remaining chicken wire (stucco netting), I caged them up. No fancy stuff here, just cut the chicken wire to fit around the inside of each container and securing them by bending the cut ends into makeshift hooks. I then carefully lowered them into the containers.

The task was challenging because 4 out of the 5 containers were root bound so I could not move those containers. So, it was a matter of detangling the multiple canes to know which canes belonged to which container. Aside from the weeds, surrounding the containers are a few canes that came through the containers’ drainage holes, enjoying the uncaged life – freedom! Several blackberry flowers have emerged so I’m likely to enjoy these fruits this season. The next challenge, of course, will be the trick of removing cages as needed come harvest time – steady hands!

 

Black Krim Tomato Plant, from Broken Vine is Fruiting

Last season, my one Black Krim tomato plant grew vigorously in the ground, where it has remained to this day. But during last season, part of the vine broke off. This broken part did not have any tomatoes yet, but I decided to plant it as a stand alone in a 5-gallon container with potting soil.

Happily, this plant is now fruiting. This is an easy way to propagate tomato plants. Simply plant them into potting soil and water enough to keep moist a couple of times per week.

I’ve already eaten several pounds of Black Krim tomatoes from the parent plant and it’s only early June, so I imagine that between the parent plant, this one,  and separate Black Krim plant taken from another piece of broken vine and in its own container, I will be quite awash with just these tomatoes. I’m waiting to see if other varieties will take in my raised row bed garden.

I’ve not decided if I will eventually transplant them into the ground since they seem happy in their containers. Certainly, this season, they will remain in their containers, now that they’re fruiting. This is shaping up to be a bountiful season.

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE: The non-fruit parts of tomato plants are poisonous if ingested. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

Thornless Blackberry Plants, Thriving

They were small, neat, and tidy when I bought them, honest! But these thornless blackberry plants are enjoying their sunny location a lot. I’ll have to figure out how to get them a bit more tidy-ish. No use to move the containers as they’ve firmly rooted through the containers’ drain holes and have sprouted new shoots  inches and feet away directly into the surrounding soil. This gives me hope that I may get some blackberries this year. I’d shared some cuttings with a friend, but looks like I’ll have to share with even more friends before I’m through – not a bad problem to have!

Crown Princess Margareta Rose Debut

About 3-1/2 years ago, I bought several English roses, in containers, to replace several that were planted in-ground but were decimated by gophers who devoured their roots. I’ve kept them in their original containers all this time because of this.  Having a “buy now, investigate later” mindset, I found that these plants were not suited to grow in my area, but were still selling here (a rather dodgy business practice).

Taking a chance, I’ve seen some meet an untimely end (e.g., Munstead wood), but I am so very pleased to report that this past week, the two climbing Crown Princess Margareta rose plants have flowered! Mind you, these were not extraordinary displays (1 flower for one plant, 3 for another), it was heartening that they fought on against all odds and provides a very positive message of hope and patience. I don’t mind that it flowers every few years, as long as it does, which is probably an unusual perspective, but I love these plants.

More information on this fragrant beauty can be found here: http://www.davidaustinroses.com/us/crown-princess-margareta-english-climbing-rose

Thornless Blackberry Propagation

An all-too-familiar experience, I stumbled upon a solution to problem I didn’t know I even had! Months ago, I purchased 5 Thornless Triple Crown Blackberry plants. In their first season at my home, they produced a few fruits, which I was quite grateful for, but wasn’t expecting anything more than their simply acclimating to their new home in large containers in my back yard.

We’d had an unusually wet winter in our area and gardening would have been a muddy affair, so I let nature and my plants alone for most of that time. The sunny days of spring here have revealed to me that some of these 5 plants decided to propagate themselves during that time. The canes of the plants grew quite long and the tips of some of the plants had reached and dipped into the soil of a few of the adjoining containers, while others dipped into the outside the containers directly into the surrounding raw soil of my garden. This propagation technique, whether done on purpose by the gardener or by nature is called tip layering (more information on several kinds of layering techniques: https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/plant-propagation-by-layering-instructions-for-the-home-gardener).

Check out the roots forming at the tip of a cane that wandered into another container. I severed it from the parent plant so both can continue growing in their containers and will (hopefully) be thriving and fruitful. The second photo is the wandering canes that found their new homes in  the raw garden soil, which will also (hopefully) find great happiness in their new homes.

I am so grateful for these unexpected learning opportunities since now, it seems, I will likely have all of the blackberry plants and blackberries I can possibly handle in the near and distant future. It’s such an awesome and humbling thing when good fortune, such as this, just shows up. I’m exquisitely pleased!

 

Aunt Ruby’s German Green Tomatoes

You’d think I’d never grown tomatoes before, but I’m so excited when a tomato plant is fruiting! I ran out of raised row and container space (first world problem) so I planted one Aunt Ruby’s German tomato seed in the ground. It must love this location because the plant has grown tall and wide and is covered in tomatoes. Wow! This makes me want to plant a third of these and other tomato seeds in raised rows, a third in containers, and a third in the ground next year. Best laid plants!

The tomatoes are in various stages of maturity, but the one pictured may be ready to pick in no more than two weeks. This beautiful heirloom tomato looks mighty fine and, I’m sure, will be very, very delicious!img_3374

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE: The non-fruit parts of tomato plants are poisonous if ingested. More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

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