Miniature Greenhouse to Start My Fruits and Vegetables

Years ago, I tried starting my fruit and vegetable garden using a plastic miniature greenhouse, without success (failure of seeds to germinate). Thereafter, I planted my seeds directly into the soil outdoors, with variable success. These days, I am more mindful of not wasting resources (including seeds) and thought that the greenhouse idea might be worth revisiting.

Last month, I purchased a miniature greenhouse and I am happy to report that there has been some success in that seedlings have emerged! The only ones that have not yet shown seedlings are the lettuces, but I am hopeful.

I planted my seeds in columns (12). From left to right, here are the plants in my greenhouse: (1) yellow squash, (2) green squash, (3) golden wax beans, (4) tender green beans, (5) Black Krim tomatoes, (6 + 7) Green Zebra tomatoes, (8) long purple eggplant, (9) Black Beauty eggplant, (10) Bibb buttercrunch lettuce, (11) ruby lettuce, and (1) crimson sweet watermelon.

The golden wax beans are growing quite rapidly and actually lifting up the dome. To allow the seedlings that are developing more slowly a chance to benefit from the warmth of the greenhouse, I decided to transplant the golden wax bean seedlings directly into the soil outside.

I am very excited about the possibility of having a nice bounty of delicious homegrown produce this year!

HOW TO: I purchased a Jiffy greenhouse that came with 72 peat pellets. (about $7 – Jiffy also makes smaller greenhouses). The dried peat pellets (disks) that are activated (expanded and softened) with warm water. I drained off excess water.  After several minutes, I loosened up the soil in each planted 2-3 seeds per pellet. It took a little bit of time, but simple to do.

After I finished planting the seeds in each peat pellet, I covered the pellet tray with a dome (included in the kit). I placed the greenhouse in my living room, behind the glass of the patio door, to allow for indirect sunlight.

Seedlings started to emerge after 1 week, but many more at the end of the second week. The ones that are developing the fastest, the golden wax beans, were transplanted outdoors today, directly into the soil.

When the other seedlings are more mature, I will transplant them directly into the soil outside as well (after thinning out the seedlings that appear weak by pulling them out of the peat pellet).

CONSUMER ALERT UPDATE: The non-fruit parts of tomato plants are poisonous if ingested.  More information on toxic plants can be found here:

http://www.calpoison.org/hcp/KNOW%20YOUR%20PLANTS-plant%20list%20for%20CPCS%2009B.pdf

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